Thinking about New York Time’s Article on Guardianships and One Woman’s Personal Story

Home / Reposting Articles / Thinking about New York Time’s Article on Guardianships and One Woman’s Personal Story

For anyone working in legal fields where adult guardianships may be an option, for anyone teaching elder law, health care law, constitutional law or even landlord-tenant law, a recent New York Times article, “I’m Petitioning . . . for the Return of My Life,” is an important read.

On a threshold level, this is a well-told tale of one woman, Ms. Funke, who becomes subject to an intervention under New York adult protective services law, and, eventually, to a full-blown guardianship proceeding.   It can be easy to become enraged on behalf of Ms. Funke as you read details about her past life as a freelance journalist and world traveler, and compare it to the limitations placed on her essential existence under a guardianship.

The article is a rather classic example of using one tragic story, a human story, to paint a picture of a government process gone wrong.  At several points in the article, the writer, John Leland, offers questions that suggest some conclusions about how unfair the process has been to Ms. Funke.  The writer asks, for example,

“If you were Ms. Funke, shouldn’t you be allowed to withdraw into the covers [of your bed] if you wanted to?  And the clutter in your apartment — couldn’t people understand that a writer needs materials around?  Even if she were evicted, she had money to start somewhere else.  Courts evict people with lots less [than she appears to have]. “

It’s implied that the answers to those questions may outweigh the fact that the protective services intervention prevented the landlord from completing an eviction of Ms. Funke, an eviction that would have forced her out of her apartment of 40+ years.

To read the full article click here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *